i guess you could say that mystery is sometimes better than sensibility

 

sleepysheepie:

cismouse:

killcode102:

cismouse:

GUYS

THEY ARE TRYING TO TAKE THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT DOWN

AND REPLACE IT WITH THE BULLSHIT ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT SELF-DETERMINATION ACT

THAT ALLOWS STATES TO DECIDE  IF THEY EVEN WANT TO ABIDE BY LAWS PROTECTING SPECIES AT ALL

AND DELISTS SPECIES AFTER ONLY FIVE YEARS

DOES ANYONE ELSE EVEN CARE

Source this

1 2 3 4 5

better question; how do we stop this?

(Source: idolyuri)

amber-skies-with-dragons:

 “Tiffany stone is a rare, opaque gemstone found only in a small region of southwestern Utah”

Requested by weareyounggawds.

galesofnovember:

I actually refuse to believe that there is anyone genuinely arguing that “fuck them skinny bitches”  is a problematic, body-shaming, anti-feminist statement.  

I mean, I don’t even care to engage in the ~politics~ of ~bodies~.  I just don’t want to live in a world where anyone is that joyless.

Do not avoid contact with suffering or close your eyes before suffering. Do not lose awareness of the existence of suffering in the life of the world.

 Thich Nhat Hanh (via purplebuddhaproject)

glitterswitch:

rawr0609:

therawrchannel:

thinksquad:

A Democratic Missouri state senator representing parts of Ferguson who tweeted multiple times “fuck you,” at Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon defended her choice of words on Fox News Monday saying she did so because she was tear-gassed for three days.

“The reason why I used profane language is because he has allowed us to get tear-gassed for three days,” Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal said. “I am one of his senators in his party and he was at the state fair enjoying a country concert while we were getting teargassed and shot at. And yes, anyone who’s going to get teargassed deserves to say a few ‘F’ bombs here and there.”

“I represent my constituents, not Gov. Nixon,” the senator said. “He has been absent from the minority community his entire career and only comes before us when it is politically expedient for him. Or when he’s running for office, and because he has been outside of this community…let me tell you this, and this is important for your audience to know. He has still yet to come to ground zero. Yet to come to ground zero. He’s been in Florissant, he’s been in Normandy, but he has not spoken to the victims of the crisis we are dealing with and that is why I have called him a coward.”

http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/missouri-state-senator-says-she-tweeted-fck-you-at-governor#32tdaru

real shit

run for president

Yeah, I want her to go big places, she’s the best.

todayinhistory:

August 21st 1831: Nat Turner’s rebellion begins

On this day in 1831 the Virginian slave Nat Turner began the deadliest slave rebellion the United States had ever seen, which resulted in the deaths of 55 whites. Turner, a slave preacher, had come to believe that God intended for him to lead a black uprising against the injustice of slavery. In the evening of August 21st 1831, Turner and his co-conspirators met in the woods to make their plans and early the next morning began the rebellion by killing Turner’s master’s family. Turner and his men, who soon numbered over 80, then went from house to house assaulting the white inhabitants. Eventually a local militia, and then federal and state troops, confronted the rebels and dispersed the group. Turner himself initially evaded capture but was captured on October 30th. Subsequently Turner, along with over fifty other rebels, was executed. However the retribution for Nat Turner’s rebellion did not end there. The uprising sent shockwaves across the South, and while full scale rebellion such as Turner’s was rare in the Deep South due to the rigid enforcement of the slave system, caused widespread fear of another rebellion. In the ensuing hysteria over 200 innocent black slaves were killed by white mobs. Turner’s rebellion came close to ending slavery in Virginia, as in its wake the state legislature considered abolishing the ‘peculiar institution’. However the measure was voted down and instead the state decided to increase plantation discipline and limit slaves’ autonomy even further by banning them from acting as preachers and learning to read. Similar measures were adopted across the slave-holding South and thus Nat Turner’s rebellion increased the South’s commitment to slavery, despite undermining the pro-slavery argument that it was a benevolent system and slaves were content. Turner has left behind a complicated legacy, with some seeing him as an African-American hero and others as a religious fanatic and villain; his memory raises the eternal question of whether violence is justified to bring about necessary change.